General Parenting Resources

  • Alliance for Parental Involvement in Education – Besides organizational information on this organization that encourages parent involvement in education, provides sample articles from its “Options in Learning” newsletter on significant topics.
    http://www.croton.com/allpie/
  • American Montessori Society (AMS) – A starting point for learning about the Montessori education approach; contains explanatory articles, bibliographies and research studies, a list of public Montessori schools, and AMS position papers on a variety of education topics.
    http://www.amshq.org/
  • American Psychological Association – Use search feature on “Psychnet” page (search on “parenting”) to find the latest research on parenting children of all ages. Includes articles on a variety of topics, including: “Raising Children to Resist Violence: What You Can Do,” “Violence on Television: What Do Children Learn? What Can Parents Do?” “What Makes Kids Care? Teaching Gentleness in a Violent World,” and “Answers to Questions About Sexual Orientation and Homosexuality.”
    http://psycom.net/
  • American School Directory – If you are moving and want to research potential schools for your children, or looking for an address or a fax number for a school, the American School Directory probably offers it. Commonly listed information on many of the schools indexed on the site include number of students, number of homerooms, grades, phone and fax numbers, web addresses, school calendars, and administrators.
    http://www.asd.com/
  • AskERIC Virtual Library – Operated by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information & Technology, this site provides access to a myriad of education resources and to the AskERIC question answering service for parents and educators. Parenting questions are responded to by a parenting professional.
    http://www.askeric.org
  • Awesome Library – Organizes exploration of the World Wide Web with 10,000 resources, based on whether you identify yourself as a teacher, parent, student, community member, or librarian. Includes a directory, an index, and a new search engine. Sites are also organized by subject area and school functions.
    http://www.neat-schoolhouse.org/awesome.html
  • The Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators– Information about Montessori schools in Canada and the Montessori method of education in general.
    http://www.ccma.ca/ccma/
  • Child & Family Canada – lots of information about child care, child development, parenting, health, safety, literacy, nutrition, physical activities, play, family life, adolescence, learning activities, social issues and special needs; in French and English. From the Vanier Institute of the Family.
    http://www.cfc-efc.ca/
  • Children First – The website of the National PTA highlights PTA publications and programs, includes selected articles from PTA publications, links to web pages of state and local PTAs, and links to organizations of interest to child advocates. Contains the “National Standards for Parent/Family Involvement Programs” developed by the National PTA.
    http://www.pta.org/
  • Children Now – Contains legislative and advocacy information on children’s issues and welfare reform, the “Media Now” Newsletter, press releases on policy issues, and booklets and articles on tough issues for parents.
    http://www.childrennow.org
  • Children’s Literature Web Guide – All of this site is worth exploring for learning more about children’s books, but the “Resources for Parents” section here is particularly good. The site is an attempt to gather together and categorize the growing number of Internet resources related to books for children and young adults.
    http://www.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/
  • Children, Stress, and Natural Disasters – Contains a set of resources useful to parents as well as teachers to help prepare them for working with or parenting children who have been through a disaster. For children at all grade levels.
    http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~disaster/teacher/teacher.html
  • Community Update – From the U.S. Department of Education, this newsletter reaches over 200,000 parents, educators, and other citizens involved in school improvement efforts across the country. Featuring “best practices” and model programs from around the nation, Community Update focuses on how communities can learn from each other as they improve their schools.
    http://bcol01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OIIA/communityupdate/page1.cfm
  • Disney’s Family.Com – Contains sections on activities, computing, learning, parenting, food, and travel; parenting section can be searched by age of child and topic.
    http://www.family.com
  • ECS Parent Involvement in Education – Interested in seeing how your state compares to other states’ legislation on parent involvement in education? The Education Commission of the States provides this information in table form at this site. To view page, you need to go to the site, go to it’s search command, and type in “Parent Involvement in Education”
    http://www.ecs.org/ecs/ecsweb.nsf/HTMLFrameObjects/Frameset-HomePage?OpenDocument
  • Education Week on the Web – Schools across the country are trying everything they can to get parents more actively involved in their children’s education. Education Week provides articles from past issues as background reading for interested parents and educators.
    http://www.edweek.org/context/topics/parent.htm
  • Empowering People – A commercial site advertising the “Positive Discipline” books of Dr. Jane Nelson, this site also offers a free newsletter on positive discipline, articles for parents and teachers, and an extensive set of answers to questions on parenting and classroom discipline issues. Empowering People includes articles for parents and teachers on many topics, guidelines from “Positive Discipline” and “Raising Self-Reliant Children in a Self-Indulgent World,” excerpts from various products and resources, information on workshops and lectures, and the ability to send parenting questions to Dr. Jane Nelson.
    http://www.empoweringpeople.com/
  • FairTest Fact Sheets – At the National Center for Fair and Open Testing several fact sheets are available, including: “What’s Wrong with Standardized Tests,” “How Standardized Testing Damages Education,” “The Testing Explosion,” “Readiness Tests,” and “Achievement Tests for Young Children.”
    http://www.fairtest.org/facts/main.htm
  • Families and Education – Provides information and ideas to help parents understand how schools and other educational programs work, how children learn, and how parents and families can best contribute to the learning process. Includes the brochure series “Parents ASK…” in English and Spanish, and documents related to parent involvement.
    http://www.rmcres.com/famed/
  • Family Connections – Family Connections are print materials that describe activities and provide “read-alouds” that parents can use with their children. The activities are low-costbecause they use materials commonly found in homes. The guides are written at fifth-grade or lower reading level, so virtually everyone can read and understand them. This site contains some sample activities and “read-alouds.”
    http://www.ael.org/rel/fc/fcactiv.htm
  • Family Education Network – The purpose of the Family Education Network (FEN) is to provide education information, resources, and services for families; connect parents with experts and other parents for advice and support; and empower parents to speak out on education issues. Designed as on “online community center” for parents with children up to age 18, the site features: Learning at School, Learning at Home, Learning Tools, Learning Activities, Learning for Kids, Special Needs, and Issues and Action. An online discussion area is also available.
    http://familyeducation.com/home/
  • Family Living Programs: Parenting the First Year – This site has the Parenting the First Year newsletter, which is age-paced and research-based advice for parents about their child’s first 12 months. This series is also provided in Spanish. This site will soon feature Parenting the 2nd and 3rd Year articles. A list of low-cost pamphlets on family topics is also provided.
    http://www.uwex.edu/ces/flp/parenting/
  • Fatherhood Project – The Fatherhood Project is a national research and education program that is examining the future of fatherhood and developing ways to support men’s involvement in childrearing. Current components include: (1) The Male Involvement Project; (2) National Practitioners’ Network; and (3) Father-Friendly Businesses. The site offers descriptions of available publications and listings of other fatherhood resources.
    http://www.fatherhoodproject.org/
  • Future of Children – Presented by the Center for the Future of Children (funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation) this site contains issues of an academic journal available in print and online. Recent issues have focused on welfare to work, juvenile court, financing child care, and critical issues for children and youth.
    http://www.futureofchildren.org/
  • Gauche! Left Handers in Society – Parents’ section of this web site provides information on the early development of left-handers, on common school problems, and offers advice from other parents of left-handers.
    http://www.indiana.edu/~primate/lspeak.html
  • Hand in Hand – A campaign sponsored by Mattel Toys and the Institute for Educational Leadership, Hand in Hand works to share information about programs that expect, value, and nurture a family and community role in children’s learning. Contains a description of the campaign, resources for parents in English and Spanish, national linkages, and challenges facing the project.
    http://www.handinhand.org/
  • The Keeping Kids Reading Page – Provides monthly tips on how to encourage kids to read instead of forcing them to read. Answers common reading questions about ways to develop the love of reading at an early age.
    http://www.tiac.net/users/maryl/
  • Kids Connect @ the Library – The “Librarian’s Guide To Cyberspace for Parents & Kids” and extensive tips for parents on reading and Internet use are available on this site from the American Library Association.
    http://www.ala.org/parentspage/greatsites/guide.html
  • Kids’ Money – Contains a survey on family allowance practices, and articles on teaching kids to be thrifty, money management, investing, a parents’ book list, and a discussion group on kids’ money.
    http://www.kidsmoney.org
  • Nashville Parent Magazine – Contains feature articles, links, and listings of local meetings and local organizations. Feature articles are of general interest, and are on such topics as naptime, divorce mediation, and helping children find their special interest.
    http://www.nashvilleparent.com
  • The National Association for Year-Round Education – Serving as a clearinghouse for information on year-round education, time, and learning, the site contains articles on the history of year round schooling, provides examples of school schedules and calendars, and lists several year-round schools.
    http://www.nayre.org/
  • National Center for Fathering – Works to inspire and equip men to be better fathers. Site contains “Today’s Father” magazine, articles on the life course of fathering, practical tips for dads, and information on the fathering movement.
    http://www.fathers.com/
  • National Center for Fathering – To inspire and equip men to be better fathers. The site features “Today’s Father” magazine (with a radio-script version of many articles), tips for fathers, research on the importance of fathers in their children’s lives, and ways to connect with other fathers.
    http://www.fathers.com
  • The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education (NCPIE) – NCPIE is dedicated to developing effective family/school partnerships. Provides “Guidelines for Schools and School Districts” in creating family-school partnerships and describes the purpose and activities of NCPIE.
    http://www.ncpie.org/
  • National Network for Family Resiliency (NNFR) – The thought-provoking articles for parents linked to from this page, although not extremely current, are from NNFR, an interactive network which provides leadership for the acquisition, development, and analysis of resources that foster family resiliency (defined as “the family’s ability to cultivate strengths to positively meet the challenges of life”).
    http://www.glue.umd.edu/~fraz/nnfr.html
  • The Natural Child Project – Features “libraries” of articles by Jan Hunt, Alice Miller, Naomi Aldort, and guest authors, and regular features, including a Parenting Advice Column, letters from readers, and a featured parenting site of the month.
    http://www.naturalchild.com/
  • Parent News – Offers interactive opportunities for parents, family movie reviews, parent advice forums, parent news library and archives, and a Parents’ Choice bookstore.
    http://www.parent.net
  • Parenthood Web – Includes a library of resources, a newsletter, product reviews, “Ask the Pros,” “It’s Your Turn” parent forums, and results of several parent surveys.
    http://www.parenthoodweb.com
  • Parenting Pipeline – This site, managed by the North Dakota State University Extension Service (NDSU), contains newsletters for parents of preschoolers, kindergartners, second, fourth, and sixth graders, and teens. Each newsletter consists of articles on perennial issues related to parenting and family life.
    http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extnews/pipeline/
  • Parenting Press – The “parent tips” section of this web site consist of information on topics such as tattling, children’s feelings, summer and holiday activities, and guidance and discipline. Primarily a commercial site that sells parenting books.
    http://www.ParentingPress.com/index.html
  • Parenting Q&A – Provides answers to parenting questions from visitors or parents can read responses to previous questions (arranged by topic, including behavior, family relationships, grandparenting, etc.).
    http://www.parenting-qa.com/
  • ParentingMatters – A “Forum” within the LifeMatters site. Articles included here cover a wide range of topics, and promote a democratic style of parenting that is firm, yet fair, as well as mutually respectful.
    http://lifematters.com/parentn.html
  • ParentsPlace.Com – Offers articles on pregnancy, breastfeeding, babies, adolescence, parenting twins, step-parenting, single parenting, fathering, children’s health and education, recalls and notices of children’s products, and family activities, plus opportunities for parenting dialog and for shopping. Includes the “At-Home Dad” Newsletter.
    http://www.parentsplace.com/
  • Partnership for Family Involvement in Education – This part of the U.S. Department of Education site highlights timely topics, a calendar of events, information sources, resources and programs, and nationwide initiatives such as AMERICA GOES BACK TO SCHOOL, READ*WRITE*NOW, and PREPARING YOUR CHILD FOR COLLEGE.
    http://pfie.ed.gov/
  • Pathways to School Improvement: Parent and Family Involvement – Provides papers on “critical issues” related to parent involvement, and links to parenting resources on the Web.
    http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/pa0cont.htm
  • Positive Parenting Online – Includes features, listings of organizations, an index to experts nearby or in your community, live chat with certified parenting educators, bulletin board, and “Positive Parenting Newsletter.”
    http://www.positiveparenting.com/
  • RAISIN – or “Currents for Parents Raisin Children,” offers the latest national, regional, and state news about parent and family issues, education, and entertainment. Also includes information on recalls and a section titled “What’s in Print,” which highlights newspaper stories on these issues.
    http://www.raisinnet.com/
  • Reaching All Families: Creating Family Friendly Schools – Features the complete text of this 1996 publication from the U. S. Department of Education.
    http://www.ed.gov/pubs/ReachFam/index.html
  • READ*WRITE*NOW – An online publication from the U.S. Department of Education, this site features activities for reading and writing fun for children from preschool through grade 6. Includes a reading list for each age level.
    http://www.ed.gov/Family/RWN/Activ97/
  • Single Rose – Resource for Single Mothers – Provides articles on issues faced by single mothers raising children alone: divorce, recovery, dealing with anger, child support, and custody issues. Articles are written by psychologists, lawyers, doctors, and single mothers, often with real-life vignettes.
    http://www.singlerose.com/
  • TWINS Magazine – Contains selected articles from Twins Magazine on raising and educating twins.
    http://www.twinsmagazine.com/
  • U.S. Department of Education Publications for Parents – Provides electronic listings of resources and materials designed to address parents’ concerns about their children’s education. Includes the “Helping Your Child” Series, “Learning Partners” flyers containing age-appropriate learning activities, “Preparing Your Child for College,” and other information on funding a college education.
    http://www.ed.gov/pubs/parents/
  • UEWEB (ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education) – Contains ERIC Digests and other materials on urban education, materials in Spanish for parents and educators, and parent guides on helping children develop their talents, choosing after school programs, and several other subjects.
    http://eric-web.tc.columbia.edu/home_files/pub_list.html#bipg
  • The WonderWise Parent – Intended for parents and professionals to help them learn more about parent-child relationships. Includes on-line courses to complete (for both credit and noncredit), publications to view, and sections devoted to humor and children in the news.
    http://www.ksu.edu/wwparent/wondhome.htm

Infants, Toddlers, Preschoolers:

  • Babyworld – Provides an alternative (British) point of view on caring for a new baby, in addition to articles on pregnancy, infant development, private schools, child care, and financial concerns of new parents. An FAQ section and an “Ask the Expert” section offer direct advice.
    http://www.babyworld.com
  • CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES AT RISK INITIATIVE UPDATE – Features links to the research on brain development and implications for raising and caring for children, and child development resources.
    http://www.nncc.org/wh/whconf.html
  • EarlyChildhood.Com – Contains advice from experts in the early childhood field, provides lots of creative projects and arts and crafts, and provides a forum for sharing ideas and questions with the early childhood education community.
    http://www.earlychildhood.com/
  • For Parents of Preemies – The University of Wisconsin and The Center For Perinatal Care at Meriter Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin prepare the information on this site. Included are answers to frequently asked questions from parents of premature infants and from those who are concerned about having a premature baby. Includes a section on preemies’ common learning and behavioral problems during the school years.
    http://www.medsch.wisc.edu/childrenshosp/Parents_of_Preemies/ index.html
  • Healthy Steps for Young Children Program – Describes a new across-the-board approach to pediatric health care for all children from birth to age three that focuses on their physical, psychological, emotional, and intellectual growth and development, and is dedicated to encouraging strong relationships between pediatric practices and parents. Some existing pediatric practices implement the Healthy Steps approach, monitoring child health and development, promoting good health practices, and helping respond to parents’ concerns about their developing infant or toddler. Includes a publications catalog and a list of operating sites.
    http://www.healthysteps.org
  • I Am Your Child – Contains information on child development from birth to age three, including identification of key issues, brain facts, parent questions and expert advice, “ages and stages” information, and ideas for community action to improve the lives of young children.
    http://www.iamyourchild.org/
  • Information for Women with Infants and Toddlers – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers information for parents on infant nutrition, preventing poisoning, and infant formulas. Provides detailed, research-based information about infant/toddler nutrition, including breastfeeding and introducing solid foods.
    http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/wh-infnt.html
  • NAEYC – National Association for the Education of Young Children (the largest early childhood education professional association) site contains information for parents on the importance of the early years as learning years, including implications of brain development research, helping young children learn about reading, and ways young children can be smart (e.g., the concept of multiple intelligences).
    http://www.naeyc.org/
  • Parent Education Resources – A commercial site with information on kindergarten readiness and responses to questions about kindergarten from parents.
    http://www.parent-education.com/
  • ReadyWeb – A compilation of resources on (1) getting children ready for school and (2) getting schools ready for children, from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education.
    http://readyweb.crc.uiuc.edu/

Grades K-6:

  • 365 Outdoor Activities You Can Do with Your Child – Activities are divided loosely by WHERE they can be done, by SEASON, and by KIND of activity.
    http://www.family.com/Categories/Activities/Features/family_0401_01/dony/donyout_index/
  • National Families in Action (NFIA) – works to help parents protect children from drug use and drug dealing by strengthening, or in some cases rebuilding, families and communities. Provides accurate drug information to parents and young people. Site includes an ask the expert section, a q/a section, catalog of resources, and information on NFIA’s ethnic/cultural partners program.
    http://www.emory.edu/NFIA/
  • Parenting of K-6 Children – Features articles on topics related to raising school-aged children, including entertainment and parties, contests, web safety for children, and links to other parenting sites.
    http://childparenting.miningco.com/

Weekly Reader Parent Supplement – An Interview with Donna Shalala, head of the U.S. Department on Health and Human Services, on children’s issues.
http://www.nida.nih.gov/WeeklyReader/WeeklyReader.html